04/20/2017

The Democrats Didn’t Even Win A Moral Victory In Georgia

Jeremy Carl, National Review

I don’t want to sound like the Baghdad Bob of the 2018 election cycle, but the special election in Georgia’s 6th congressional district was yet another reminder that despite the mainstream media’s relentless narrative attempting to turn the early days of the Trump administration into a story of GOP rout, reality has stubbornly refused to cooperate with them.

Don’t get me wrong—the GOP is absolutely facing headwinds in 2018. And there’s a lot of political ground left to cover in November. I’d certainly rather be in a position of winning districts by increasing margins rather than decreasing ones. Could the GOP lose the House?—Absolutely. But, as I wrote in my recent analysis of the 2018 election cycle, the Senate is not going to go Democratic in this political environment—or even anything close to it.

GA-06 is according to both the Cook PVI and 538.com the most Democratic-leaning seat in GA held by a Republican. There are 46 districts held by the GOP that are more Democratic than this one according to the 538 model. On the surface that would seem alarming for the GOP since the Democrats need win only 25 more seats to get a majority. But most of these are only very narrowly closer than GA-06. And very few of them will be open seats, as this one was. Given the broader context of the race, the political handicappers had already rated this race as a toss-up.  The vast majority of  allegedly vulnerable GOP seats are rated as no worse than GOP leans.

And GOP candidates look to have won overall by a couple of percent in an election in which they were badly outspent and spent most of their time attacking each other while Ossoff got slobberly wet kisses from the media and a largely free ride from his GOP opponents. Ossoff got tons of love and money from Hollywood, raising and spending well more than $8 million.

Regardless of what happens in the June runoff, Democrats are not going to bottle that same level of energy and attention and put it in 435 districts in November. They needed a victory and they didn’t get it. And at the end of the day, they didn’t even get that close, finishing with 48.1% of the vote.

Read full article



You May Also Like:

At 100-Day Rally, Trump Marks Accomplishments, Blasts Dems And Media Frank Miles, Fox News

Politico Poll Of White House Press Corps Includes Grand Total Of Three Republicans David Rutz, The Washington Free Beacon

Rumor: Roger Ailes In Talks For New Conservative Network? Allahpundit, Hot Air

Obama Gets Fabulously Rich After Keeping America Poor [Watch] Investor’s Business Daily

Peggy Noonan: Democratic Party ‘Blowing Itself Up’ [Watch] Eddie Scarry, Washington Examiner

Elizabeth Warren: A Factory Of Bad Ideas [Watch] Ken Blackwell, Townhall

Why President Donald Trump’s Tax Plan Is Brilliant Politics And Even Better Economics Jeffrey Tucker, Rare

Yes, The Nation Can Afford Trump’s Tax Cuts Tyler Cowen, New York Post

Twitter Proves New NY Times Columnist Bret Stephens Right About ‘Nasty Left’ Matthew Balan, Mediaite

Poll: Tax Burden Linked To Desire To Move Out Of State Stephanie Marken And Zac Auter, Gallup

Yale College Republicans Host Barbecue Right Next To Hunger Strike Thomas Phippen, Daily Caller

British Students: Clapping And Cheering Excludes Deaf People [Watch] Lukas Mikelionis, Heat Street

Report: Megyn Kelly’s First Interview Is With The Kardashians Katie Jerkovich, The Smokeroom

For More go to the Home Page >>>

Search

Bookshelf

SHARE

Some titles recent, all recommended -

Special Video Feature



Voices From The 2017 International Students For Liberty Conference

In Search Of History

SHARE

Keynesian Economics and the Great Depression

Hillsdale College economics professor Gary Wolfram discusses Keynesian economics and the factors that pulled the national economy out of the Great Depression. The story of World War II shows that government spending may produce activity, but not the prosperity of a truly healthy economy.

 

-- Gary Wolfram, Hillsdale College,

Shadow Stats Snapshot


ShadowStats alternate economic indicators are based on the methodology of noted economist John Williams, specialist in government economic reporting.

  • Unemployment:
    BLS: 4.5%
    Shadow Stats: 22.5%
  • Inflation:
    March Year-to-Year: 2.38% (CPI-U*)
    Shadow Stats: 10.1%

*[cpi-u is the Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation rate for all urban consumers]