04/02/2017

Are Obamacare Insurance Mandates Really That Popular?

Jenny Beth Martin, The Washington Times

ANALYSIS/OPINION

So, we found out in last week’s AHCA exercise that despite there being 237 Republicans in the House of Representatives, there are not 218 votes there to repeal the core elements of Obamacare – the insurance company mandates that are causing skyrocketing premiums. That, ultimately, is the key flaw that led to the bill’s demise.

Of course Republicans are all for repealing the law’s tax increases, and even a lot of the spending increases, and the individual and employer mandates, and many (though possibly not a majority) even support reforming Medicaid. Those elements were in the bill, and they were all good.

But it’s really the insurance mandates that are the key to repealing Obamacare. Until those insurance mandates – specifically, “Guaranteed Issue,” “Community Rating,” and “Essential Health Benefits” – are repealed, Obamacare’s individual exchanges will continue to be in a so-called “death spiral,” that death spiral will accelerate, and skyrocketing premiums will continue to be the rule, rather than the exception.

Consequently, no bill that fails to repeal these insurance mandates can really be called “Obamacare repeal.”

As House Speaker Paul Ryan and his leadership team survey the state of affairs, they should be asking themselves a simple question: Why are there more votes to save these three elements of Obamacare than there are votes to repeal them? Answer: Because they’re “popular” with the public, of course, and only foolhardy politicians want to repeal something that’s “popular.”

For those who want House Republicans actually to live up to their promises to repeal Obamacare – that is, to the tens of millions of voters who relied on Republican promises that they would do exactly that, if and when given the opportunity – that’s a problem.

Fortunately, there’s a solution.

The Cato Institute recently commissioned two surveys measuring public opinion on these aspects of Obamacare. Fielded on February 22 and 23, 2017, by YouGov, they are the first surveys of which I am aware that attempt to gauge support for these core elements of Obamacare.

When asked “Do you favor or oppose a provision in the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, that requires insurance companies cover anyone who applies for health insurance, including those who have a pre-existing medical condition,” 77 percent support, against just 20 percent who oppose, for a net +57 percent.

Read full article



You May Also Like:

Media Fail: Trump More Popular Than James Comey And FBI John Nolte, Breitbart

Report: Taxpayers’ Money Going To Islamic Charity Group With Ties To Terrorist Groups Eric Liebertman, The Daily Caller

The Big Lie: Leftists Care About Children Tom Trinko, American Thinker

Confession Of An Anti-GMO Activist Mark Lynas, The Wall Street Journal

Democrats Face Trouble From Population Losses In High-Tax Blue States [Watch] Douglas E. Schoen, Fox News

George Will Endorses Nancy Pelosi For Speaker Of The House But Does Anyone Care? streiff, RedState

The Children’s Crisis Isn’t Working Scott McKay, The American Spectator

Was Einstein A Racist? Kyle Smith, National Review

Katie Arrington Injured In Fatal Car Crash, Faces Surgery Karen Townsend, Hot Air

Macron’s Next Good Fight Editorial Board, The Wall Street Journal

Seth Rogen Refused To Take A Picture With Paul Ryan [Watch] Bruce Haring, Deadline via Page Six

For More go to the Home Page >>>

Join Our Email List



section

Bookshelf

FreeMarket Central

Some titles recent, all recommended -

Special Video Feature

FreeMarket Central

Voices From The 2017 International Students For Liberty Conference

section

In Search Of History

The Reagan Tax Cuts Worked

Thanks to "bracket creep," the inflation of the 1970s pushed millions of taxpayers into higher tax brackets even though their inflation-adjusted incomes were not rising. To help offset this tax increase and also to improve incentives to work, save, and invest, President Reagan proposed sweeping tax rate reductions during the 1980s. What happened? Total tax revenues climbed by 99.4 percent during the 1980s, and the results are even more impressive when looking at what happened to personal income tax revenues. Once the economy received an unambiguous tax cut in January 1983, income tax revenues climbed dramatically, increasing by more than 54 percent by 1989 (28 percent after adjusting for inflation).

 

-- Daniel J. Mitchell,

Shadow Stats Snapshot


FreeMarket Central

ShadowStats alternate economic indicators are based on the methodology of noted economist John Williams, specialist in government economic reporting.

  • Unemployment:
    FreeMarket Central BLS: 3.93%
    FreeMarket Central Shadow Stats: 21.5%
  • Inflation:
    FreeMarket Central May Year-to-Year: 2.46% (CPI-U*)
    FreeMarket Central Shadow Stats: 9.9%

*[cpi-u is the Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation rate for all urban consumers]

section